February 12, 2014
My 2014 Movies: The Thomas Crown Affair (1999, on Blu-ray, home collection)
I could probably go on quite a bit about the fun, bouncy nature of this terrific-looking film.
And I could point out that, even though it’s fun and bouncy, there’s also a strong under-current of the nature of adult relationships. Of trust and hurt. Loneliness. All mature themes for something seemingly so light.
I might suggest that its uber-wealthy lifestyle porn feels intoxicating and enticing, even though I don’t usually tend to be easily lured by such things.
I could wonder if it’s among my favorite roles for both Brosnan and Russo.
And I even could posit that the heist scenes are so brilliantly staged because we’re set up to root for both sides - will he get caught? will she trick him? - so even if these sequences are wildly implausible, we have a stake in them resolving either way, so it’s still amazingly fun.
But why go on so, when instead I can simply say:
My God, do I miss John McTiernan.

My 2014 Movies: The Thomas Crown Affair (1999, on Blu-ray, home collection)

I could probably go on quite a bit about the fun, bouncy nature of this terrific-looking film.

And I could point out that, even though it’s fun and bouncy, there’s also a strong under-current of the nature of adult relationships. Of trust and hurt. Loneliness. All mature themes for something seemingly so light.

I might suggest that its uber-wealthy lifestyle porn feels intoxicating and enticing, even though I don’t usually tend to be easily lured by such things.

I could wonder if it’s among my favorite roles for both Brosnan and Russo.

And I even could posit that the heist scenes are so brilliantly staged because we’re set up to root for both sides - will he get caught? will she trick him? - so even if these sequences are wildly implausible, we have a stake in them resolving either way, so it’s still amazingly fun.

But why go on so, when instead I can simply say:

My God, do I miss John McTiernan.

February 5, 2014
(via Dummies - Hollywood Elsewhere)

(via Dummies - Hollywood Elsewhere)

January 8, 2013
hidingundertrees:


HAPPY NOW, JERKS?!
I only have an hour or so before work, so don’t expect much right away. Also, this is the weirdest place to put a title? That old man is teabagging it!


If I understand correctly, Andrew from hidingundertrees is planning to watch Die Hard for the first time, which is certainly a momentous occasion for any film lover.
I wish him well. Yippie-kai-yay, etc.
And I wanted to add a brief story of the first time I saw Die Hard in the movie theater in July of 1988. I’d stayed at college over the summer because I had a better job there than I would have had at home. I didn’t have high hopes for the movie because Willis was unknown in this kind of film, having only gained popularity from Moonlighting. I didn’t know John McTiernan and certainly didn’t know Alan Rickman. So: low expectations.
I was surprised, however, that the theater was mostly full, and grabbed an aisle seat for myself. A guy came in when the lights were about to go down and asked to climb over me to one of the last vacant seats. It was easier for him to climb over me than the other dozen or so in the rest of the row, so no big deal.
The movie unspooled and thrilled me for every single one of its 132 minutes. It remains to this day one of my all-time favorites not just as an action film par excellence: but of a character study, marital drama and deconstruction of a number of 80s action-hero film tropes.
But that’s beyond my point, which is this:
When the lights came up, I sighed contentedly and looked around, amazed to see that the guy who’d climbed over me was gone.
It’s absolutely unlikely that he climbed over the other dozen people in the row during the course of the movie; to do so would have been silly and illogical.
No, I was next to him, on the aisle. He had to have climbed over me. It’s just that I genuinely had no memory whatsoever of him doing so, and I was shocked in a truly unprecedented way that he wasn’t there.
This was one of those moments where I felt like I’d learned an important lesson about the immersive power of cinema.

hidingundertrees:

HAPPY NOW, JERKS?!

I only have an hour or so before work, so don’t expect much right away. Also, this is the weirdest place to put a title? That old man is teabagging it!

If I understand correctly, Andrew from hidingundertrees is planning to watch Die Hard for the first time, which is certainly a momentous occasion for any film lover.

I wish him well. Yippie-kai-yay, etc.

And I wanted to add a brief story of the first time I saw Die Hard in the movie theater in July of 1988. I’d stayed at college over the summer because I had a better job there than I would have had at home. I didn’t have high hopes for the movie because Willis was unknown in this kind of film, having only gained popularity from Moonlighting. I didn’t know John McTiernan and certainly didn’t know Alan Rickman. So: low expectations.

I was surprised, however, that the theater was mostly full, and grabbed an aisle seat for myself. A guy came in when the lights were about to go down and asked to climb over me to one of the last vacant seats. It was easier for him to climb over me than the other dozen or so in the rest of the row, so no big deal.

The movie unspooled and thrilled me for every single one of its 132 minutes. It remains to this day one of my all-time favorites not just as an action film par excellence: but of a character study, marital drama and deconstruction of a number of 80s action-hero film tropes.

But that’s beyond my point, which is this:

When the lights came up, I sighed contentedly and looked around, amazed to see that the guy who’d climbed over me was gone.

It’s absolutely unlikely that he climbed over the other dozen people in the row during the course of the movie; to do so would have been silly and illogical.

No, I was next to him, on the aisle. He had to have climbed over me. It’s just that I genuinely had no memory whatsoever of him doing so, and I was shocked in a truly unprecedented way that he wasn’t there.

This was one of those moments where I felt like I’d learned an important lesson about the immersive power of cinema.

image

October 9, 2012

Obviously no one needs me to tell them how wonderful, how iconic this moment would become in action cinema history.

And I do understand that sequels tend to be diminishing returns on something so great, so legendary, so lightning-in-the-bottle. I get it. I know why sequels are made and why filmgoers pay to see them and all of that.

But few sequel tropes have bothered me as much over the years as how they shoehorned YIPPEE-KI-YAY into every subsequent Die Hard movie, because it makes exactly zero sense in any other movie but the original.

Here, he’s saying it as a reaction. A taunt. A comeback to Hans’ comment that he’s a bankrupt American, having seen too many John Wayne movies. It’s a witty, undermining joke that a smartass like McClane uses as a tactical weapon. It makes sense both for character and narrative.

Go back and watch where he says it in the sequels. It’s universally dumb, unmotivated, and - foolishly - often spoken to no one who can hear it. What the hell good is a signature kiss-off line that the villain doesn’t hear?

I’ll always love Die Hard. I’ll always feel fondness for Harder through A Good Day. But I sure wish a screenwriter would have come up with a way to make this line make sense again - or maybe SHOCKING, RIGHT come up with something new?

(via longcatbackwards-deactivated201)

April 25, 2012
"After you get where you’re going, take off your shoes and your socks then walk around on the rug barefoot and make fists with your toes. …Yes sir, better than a shower and a hot cup of coffee."

— Airplane Businessman

May 25, 2011
I will pretty much always reblog Die Hard- Predator- Hunt for Red October-era McTiernan.
Look how much damn fun he’s having. Ah, what might have been.
ontheset:

Die Hard (1988)

I will pretty much always reblog Die Hard- Predator- Hunt for Red October-era McTiernan.

Look how much damn fun he’s having. Ah, what might have been.

ontheset:

Die Hard (1988)

March 1, 2011
Awesome Parts of My Birthday Weekend, #2:

I also watched Die Hard again, for the first time in a long time.

Geez, John McTiernan. You could have been legendary. What the hell did you do?

November 12, 2010
I’ve mentioned this before, but Die Hard is one of my all-time permanent top-10 placement movies - but I never much cared for the Twelve terrorists. One Cop version of this one-sheet (and yes, I’ve owned both because I was once a bachelor).
I always thought that McClane’s vulnerability and the fact that he wasn’t an unstoppable juggnernaut like his cinematic predecessors Rambo and Commando made him more relatable, more human. He’s afraid, he sweats and bleeds and cries out in fear. To me, The odds are against John McClane…That’s just the way he likes it completely misses the point of the story.
He’s alone, tired… hits the mark much better. He’s also wounded in this one and looks scared rather than cocky. It’s really a different marketing tactic altogether.
"Coming this July" suggests maybe that was a teaser poster, but I’m not sure. Anyone know which of these came first?
And anyone think I’ve probably put too much thought into this over the years?
Yeah. yeah.

I’ve mentioned this before, but Die Hard is one of my all-time permanent top-10 placement movies - but I never much cared for the Twelve terrorists. One Cop version of this one-sheet (and yes, I’ve owned both because I was once a bachelor).

I always thought that McClane’s vulnerability and the fact that he wasn’t an unstoppable juggnernaut like his cinematic predecessors Rambo and Commando made him more relatable, more human. He’s afraid, he sweats and bleeds and cries out in fear. To me, The odds are against John McClane…That’s just the way he likes it completely misses the point of the story.

He’s alone, tired… hits the mark much better. He’s also wounded in this one and looks scared rather than cocky. It’s really a different marketing tactic altogether.

"Coming this July" suggests maybe that was a teaser poster, but I’m not sure. Anyone know which of these came first?

And anyone think I’ve probably put too much thought into this over the years?

Yeah. yeah.

October 27, 2010
its-strictly-business:

Top 100 Favorite Movies: 
Die Hard (1988) dir. John McTiernan

Hans Gruber: Do you really think you have a chance against us, Mr Cowboy?
John McClane: Yippee-ki-yay, motherfucker.


OH GOD PLEASE DON’T LET ME DIE.

its-strictly-business:

Top 100 Favorite Movies:

Die Hard (1988) dir. John McTiernan

Hans Gruber: Do you really think you have a chance against us, Mr Cowboy?

John McClane: Yippee-ki-yay, motherfucker.

OH GOD PLEASE DON’T LET ME DIE.

(Source: hey-paul, via thatgeeklover)

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